Buffer

Let me start this post with a caveat, I am not a financial advisor.

That said, both Mashable & Techcrunch (amongst others at time of this writing) have recently announced that Steve Jobs has resigned. This has sent shock waves through the social web as people one by one found out that the “Oracle” has left Apple.

So you may wonder why I am speculating on the stock when I am focused on user experience for a living.

I am actually basing my thoughts on human behavior which directly relates to what I do and what I have learned from working with Fearless Wealth, who has spent the time, effort, & energy to do 100 years worth of research on stock market trends and come to discover human behavior does not change. What do I mean by that? People are often quicker to flee the scene of danger then they are to stick around and ride the bumps and fluctuations that come with investments. That said, despite the fact that Apple is now richer than the US government, most people think that Steve Jobs is the direct result of Apple’s success and it’s ability to take the company from a low stock price (roughly $20-40) to the now astounding price of $376. In fact, one of my favorite books of all time, Built to Last, would probably say something similar but this is where human behavior comes into play. Most people are not well versed in growing their money and will instead resort to their fears. This will prompt a sell off, potentially in record numbers, as people flee from the perceived danger of Apple going south.

However, things to keep in mind about why I think Apple could be around for much longer.

  • Apple is now richer than the US government, which means its an extremely valuable company with lots of flush cash to invest in research and development for new products in the future.
  • Tim Cook has essentially been acting “Steve Jobs” for many months now and thus this changeover really is exactly that. It’s quite possible for all we know that this has been a secession plan that has just played itself out to it’s natural end. We may never know.
  • As people begin to accept, Tim Cook, as the new CEO and see the company move forward without Steve Jobs people will relax. Life will move forward and the stock will then begin to rebound.

  • Again, I am not a financial planner but based on my understanding of human behavior, this is what I suspect will happen. Thank you, Steve Jobs, for all your hard work and your vision. You will be missed.

    Updated: Apparently, Fast Company agrees with me with regards to Apple surviving without Jobs. Interestingly, too, this MacWorld article, points out that under Tim Cook’s leadership in 2009, the stock rose 67%.

    I have to add this too, in homage:

    Wired has gathered a bunch of quotes from Jobs over the years.